Jun 122011
 

Brazil’s second largest city, Rio de Janeiro, witnessed the first ever gathering of environmental campaigners/caretakers and produced an international environmental treaty (UNFCCC) with an objective to stabilize greenhouse gas concentrations that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference in 1992. After one and half decades, the discourse took new dimensions in Bali, developing a new road map as a two-year process of finalizing a binding agreement in 2009 in Copenhagen. But brushing aside this huge expectation, Copenhagen only produced a weak political statement titled the ‘Copenhagen accord.’ The summit could not pave a way forward for this global issue.

The road from Copenhagen to Cancun, in 2010, was also not that easy.  Cancun set an excellent example how the outstanding leadership of a host country could effectively shape the discourse. It was a well known fact that many issues were still on the table that are still unresolved, need further discussion and more political willingness.

To my surprise, these climate discourses always opt for places/countries that start with an interesting first letter. Copenhagen was followed by three meetings in Bonn and semi-final at China’s beautiful city Tianjin. Cancun was another important milestone that was also able to keep up trust on UN process. It was then followed by Bangkok and now at Bonn, both the climate capitals of Asia and Europe, respectively. One of the issues that needs resolution here is where will the next intersessional will be held. My opinion is to follow the ritual so go for places that start with initials B, C or D! But of course not Copenhagen!

Now on the way to the match in Durban, termed the “African COP,” many issues Continue reading »

Apr 042011
 

On behalf of Climate Action Network April 4, 2011 Bangkok, Thailand

Video link from UNFCCC Website, Intervention 2 and Intervention 1 (check at last 5 minutes)

Thank you Mr. Facilitator

My name is Manjeet Dhakal from Nepal and I am speaking on behalf of the Climate Action Network. The technology cooperation mechanism has been discussed for a long time and we now have a basic framework for an institutional structure under the UNFCCC. However, the entire initiative is put at risk by the failure to establish a mechanism for evaluating whether or not proposed technologies are “environmentally sound” and are worthy of support. Essential to any technology evaluation is the full and authentic participation of civil society.

The achievements of the Cancun Agreements were the formation of a Technology Mechanism, including the Technology Executive Committee (TEC) and the Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN). We urge the delegates to frame the TEC so that it can decide on every activity that will be carried out under the climate technology cooperation framework, and agree that the CTCN will operate under its supervision. Both bodies must ensure balanced representation. There is no doubt that the vulnerable courtiers, particularly LDCs would benefit from Continue reading »

Mar 292011
 

Blogging from Bangladesh

With the above mentioned theme, fifth International Conference on Community based adaptation is being held in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The first CBA earlier organized in 2005 in Bangladesh with around 50 participants has now become one of the largest gatherings of scientist, experts, policy makers and practitioners of community based adaptation (CBA). More than 350 participation from more than 60 countries from all continents and the presence of Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina at the formal inauguration on 28 March has added value to the conference.

Following the tradition of CBA conference, earlier participants were sent to eight different sites of Bangladesh to sense the real impact and community adaptation responses and practices. Followed by the field visit, the technical session started form 28 March.  According to the organizers, with many other world leaders Dr. Rajendra K. Pachauri, Chairman of IPCC will be joining the concluding session on 31 March.

As adaptation to climate change has become more and more accepted as a necessary response to the adverse Continue reading »

Feb 082011
 

This article was published at Sano PailaThe NYCA Youth Ezine on Feb 2011

For the quintillionth time, I’ve heard the senior negotiators saying that the real negotiations happen at mid night and decisions are taken after many people go to sleep. So my curiosity-saturated self decided to stay overnight during negotiations to observe what actually happens then.

I confess of my limited knowledge and understanding of issues during my participation in COP15 at Copenhagen. At that time, it was very difficult for me to follow the ongoing discussion on technology transfer. The meeting on the first day of the second week went quite long and all my colleagues had already left the venue. Continue reading »

 Posted by on February 8, 2011 at 10:36 am
Feb 082011
 

This article was published at Sano Paila: The NYCA Youth Ezine on Feb 2011

In 2008, the World Bank, with its development partners, came to an agreement to mobilize new and additional financing to scale- up support for adaptation and mitigation, and established the strategic Climate Investment Funds (CIF) that has two other funding bodies under it: Clean Technology Fund (CTF) and Strategic Climate Fund (SCF). The group, recognizing the UNFCCC deliberations, also presumes that the CIF will be an interim measure designed for the MDBs to assist in filling immediate financing gaps.

At its meeting in November 2008, the SCF Trust Fund Committee approved the Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) with an objective to pilot and demonstrate ways to integrate climate risk and resilience into core development planning, whiles complementing other ongoing activities. It also said that the pilot programs implemented under the PPCR are to be country led, Continue reading »

 Posted by on February 8, 2011 at 10:10 am
Feb 052011
 

 Published on: Sano Paila 02

For the quintillionth time, I’ve heard the senior negotiators saying that the real negotiations happen at mid night and decisions are taken after many people go to sleep. So my curiosity-saturated self decided to stay overnight during negotiations to observe what actually happens at night.Picture source: http://www.redbubble.com

I confess of my limited knowledge and understanding of issues during my participation in COP15 at Copenhagen. At that time, it was very difficult for me to trace the ongoing discussion on technology transfer. The meeting on the first day of the second week went quite long and all my colleagues had already left the venue. Because I was so resolute (and dare I say, excited) about experiencing the late night negotiations LIVE, I reluctantly ignored other tempting invitations for dinner and such outside the Bella center (the UNFCCC venue). The late night meeting ended without any conclusion, and it was then that I realized that it was already 3 am in the morning. As it was very cold outside, I decided to spend the remaining few hours until dawn inside the Bella Center, and thus, landed on a sofa. I didn’t have a clue when my eyelids evaded me and I fell asleep.

I was deep into my dreams when I was trudged back to reality by a stern voice of a tall dark UN security personnel, who, rather ruthlessly, reminded me that I had violated the security regulations by sleeping inside the UN premises. I wanted to reply back, respond, say something. But my half-sleepy, weary self was only waiting for him to disappear so that I could rest my eyes again. The same scene repeated for about three times, one can only imagine how irritated the security personnel had become at that moment! But before he came to wake me up for fourth time, I forced my sleepy fatigued self to stand up and rush for coffee machine!

Jan 242011
 

On 2008, the World Bank with its development partners came to an agreement to mobilize new and additional financing for activities and investments that demonstrate financial and other incentives to scaled-up support for adaptation and mitigation and established the strategic Climate Investment Funds (CIF) along with its other two funds under it: Clean Technology Fund (CTF) and Strategic Climate Fund (SCF). The group recognizing the UNFCCC deliberations also presumes that the CIF will be an interim measure designed for the MDBs to assist in filling immediate financing gaps.

At its meeting in November 2008, the SCF Trust Fund Committee approved the Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) with an objective to pilot and demonstrate ways to integrate climate risk and resilience into core development planning, whiles complementing other ongoing activities. It also said that the pilot programs implemented under the PPCR are to be country led, build on NAPA and other relevant country studies and strategies.

As one of its activities, last November, Bangladesh, Niger and Tajikistan were awarded a total of $270 million for first-of-a-kind country-wide plans for resilience against climate impacts. Six other low-income countries (Bolivia, Cambodia, Mozambique, Nepal, Continue reading »